Articles Posted in Drug Crimes


Controlled Substances

The Boston Globe recently reported a story about a settlement that Massachusetts General Hospital will pay to the federal government after allegations that the hospital’s lax internal controls over employee access to controlled substances resulted in the theft of thousands of prescription pain medication pills. Drug diversion, which is the use of controlled substances for nonmedical purposes, was alleged against the hospital after it was discovered that a handful of nurse employees were stealing oxycodone and other painkillers over a period of three and a half years, spanning from October of 2011 until April of 2015. Continue reading


Convicted Drug Offenders

The Massachusetts Senate recently unanimously approved a bill that is geared towards allowing convicted drug offenders to keep their driver’s licenses. The push behind the new bill is to address the issue of how difficult it is for convicted drug offenders to get a job with a criminal record, let alone how difficult it is to get to work without a driver’s license. This tough-on-crime approach is outdated and makes things considerably more difficult for those who have drug convictions. A recent blog post concerning the current state of the law can be found here.  Continue reading


Massachusetts Drug Offense Conviction

One of the lesser known but significantly impactful consequences of a Massachusetts drug offense conviction is that you will lose your driver’s license. Under 540 CMR 20.03, the Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles will suspend your driving abilities when you violate the Controlled Substance Law of the Commonwealth (M.G.L. c. 94C) or the controlled substance laws of any other state or country. Driver’s licenses can be suspended for one to five years depending on the drug conviction. Continue reading


Heroin Trafficking Defense Attorney

Fentanyl is an opioid used for pain management therapies that has become a popular street drug in recent years. It is classified as a Class B controlled substance under Mass. Gen. Laws Chapter 94C, Section 31. It is used to cut heroin, cocaine, and other drugs, often without the knowledge of the person taking the drugs. Fentanyl is a powerful drug that increases the potency of heroin and other drugs when mixed with them. Heroin overdose deaths in Massachusetts have been on the rise for many years, and increasingly, toxicology investigations find that the fentanyl being mixed with the heroin is contributing to these deaths. Continue reading


Heroin Trafficking

At the end of June, police stumbled onto evidence of heroin trafficking activity while investigating a home invasion, which lead to the discovery of one of the largest drug crimes ever in New England. News reports that more than $2.2 million dollars worth of heroin cut with fentanyl (a highly potent opioid) was recovered along with over $200,000 in cash. Continue reading


Massachusetts Crime Lab Wrongdoing

On the heels of the Annie Dookhan investigation, it came to light that there was misconduct on the part of another state chemical analysis lab technician at a drug crime lab in Amherst, Massachusetts. It was discovered that state chemist, Sonja Farak, had tampered with drug evidence samples she analyzed in 2013. Farak, who was struggling with a drug addiction, had removed cocaine from some drug evidence samples that had been submitted to the lab for testing. When the misconduct was discovered, and Farak was charged for her crimes, the Commonwealth conducted an investigation; however, there is a dispute over whether the Commonwealth made a sufficient effort to uncover just how long Farak had been conducting her lab work in this way, and how many potential drug cases were impacted by her actions. Once again Massachusetts crime lab wrongdoing issues surfaced.  Continue reading


Charged With Massachusetts Drug Crimes

In an effort to help combat opiate addiction in Gloucester, Massachusetts, local police have put forth a plan that would offer opiate addicts the chance to get the help they need without having to face the consequences of drug possession criminal charges, reports In a unique approach that attacks heroin demand, rather than the heroin supply streams, Gloucester police are looking at the problem as people who have an addiction that need help rather than rampant criminal activity fueled by dark motives such as obtaining and distributing illegal drugs for profit. Continue reading


Could Marijuana Become Legal in Massachusetts?

You can add Massachusetts’s lawmakers to the list as the most recent group of state legislators looking into the possibility of legalizing marijuana at the state level. Fifteen lawmakers in Massachusetts are in support of a bill, referred to as H.1561, that would tax and regulate the marijuana industry in Massachusetts, bringing the billion-dollar illegal marijuana trade in Massachusetts into a legitimate business sphere where state coffers can benefit from the sale and taxation of marijuana. In addition to producing a new revenue stream for the state, legalizing marijuana would reduce crime by eliminating minor marijuana criminal offenses. Continue reading


Drug Ring and Attempted Murder Arrest in Boston

Sometimes crimes can seem like something out of a movie or television drama once all of the facts surrounding the case come to light. A recent incident involving a Massachusetts high school dean and his alleged involvement in a drug ring rises to a level of Hollywood drama worthy of an Emmy nomination. Continue reading


Criminal Records and Prospective Employment

If you have a criminal record, it can add a layer of complication to your life when it comes to getting a job. Getting arrested and convicted for a violent crime or a drug crime could have a lingering effect on your career. Under Massachusetts state law, employers are not permitted to ask you about any criminal convictions you have had in the first stage of the application process. This means that on an initial job application, prospective employers may not inquire about your criminal record. However, once you have successfully made it to the interview stage, more information about your criminal past might come out into the open. This post examines criminal records and prospective employment.  Continue reading

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